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Stakeholders

Railway operators

Railway operators fall into three categories, network, train and station. Railway operators are required to have a safety permit, which is issued on acceptance of their Safety Management System (SMS) Report. Operators are defined in the National Railway Safety Regulator Act.

Freight shippers

The RSR has no direct relationship with freight shippers. Train operators need to demonstrate in their SMS how they ensure that freight shippers comply with the provisions of the National Railway Safety Regulator Act and regulations, in particular regarding the transport of dangerous goods by rail.

It is in freight shippers’ own interest to familiarise themselves with these requirements. The RSR has a direct relationship with individuals, passengers and representative organisations by means of forums which enable issues affecting safety and security to be tabled and action plans to be developed.

Contractors and suppliers

The RSR currently has no direct relationship with contractors and suppliers. Operators need to demonstrate in their SMS how they ensure that contractors and suppliers comply with the provisions of the National Railway Safety Regulator Act and regulations. It is in operators’ own interest that contractors and suppliers familiarise themselves with these requirements.

New operators and technology

The RSR evaluates the safety implications of a new operation or technology throughout the life cycle of the application, namely design, construction and commissioning. The RSR evaluates all new applications before issuing safety permits.

Government, and other regulators

Except where these organisations are railway operators as defined in the Act, the relationship with these institutions will be managed through suitable agreements, as provided for in the National Railway Safety Regulator Act. These agreements are critical to ensure that there is no duplication of functioning or misunderstanding of the relative roles and responsibilities of the parties.

Informal communities

The greatest number of rail occurrences results from the close proximity of residential communities (formal and informal) adjacent and within the railway reserve. This remains a high risk issue for RSR. The management of this risk requires a multi-disciplinary approach, involving national, provincial, and local government organisations.

Other affected parties

The RSR may be contacted to address railway safety concerns.